Course Content
Rule – 4 Ball in Play, Dead Ball, Out of Bounds
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Rule 11 – The Officials: Jurisdiction and Duties
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Appendix A Game-Official Guidelines for Serious On-Field Player Injuries
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Appendix B Lightning Policy
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Appendix C Concussions
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Appendix D Field Diagrams
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Appendix E Equipment: Additional Details
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Appendix F – Official Football Signals
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Appendix G Summary of Penalties
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Appendix H Accommodations for Student-Athletes with Disabilities
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Part II: Interpretations
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Table of Contents for Approved Rulings
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List of New and Modified Approved Rulings
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NCAA Rules
About Lesson

ARTICLE 1. There are two methods to stop a game to review a ruling on the field.

  1. The replay official and their crew shall review every play of a game. The replay official may stop a game at any time before the ball is next legally put in play (Exception: Rule 12-3-6-d) whenever they believe that:
    1. There is reasonable evidence to believe an error was made in the initial on-field ruling.
    2. The play is
    3. The outcome of a review would have a direct, competitive impact on the game.
  2. The head coach of either team may request that the game be stopped and a play be reviewed by challenging the on-field ruling.
    1. A head coach initiates this challenge by taking a team timeout before the ball is next legally put in play (Exception: Rule 12-3-6-d) and informing the referee that they are challenging the ruling of the previous play. If a head coach’s challenge is successful, they retain the challenge, which may be used only once more during the game. Thus, a coach may have a total of two challenges if and only if the initial challenge is successful.
    2. After a review has been completed, if the on-field ruling is reversed, that team’s timeout will not be charged.
    3. After a review has been completed, and the on-field ruling is not reversed, the charged team timeout counts as one of the three permitted that team for that half or the one permitted in that extra
    4. A head coach may not challenge a ruling in which the game was stopped and a decision has already been made by the replay official.
    5. If a head coach requests a team timeout to challenge an on-field ruling and the play being challenged is not reviewable, the timeout shall count as one of the three permitted team timeouts during that half of the game or the one permitted in that extra period.
    6. A head coach may not challenge an on-field ruling if all the team’s timeouts have been used for that half or in that extra period.

When To Stop a Game

ARTICLE 2. a. A game may be stopped, either by the replay official or by a head coach’s challenge, at any time before the ball is next legally put in play (Exception: Rule 12-3-6-d).

  1. No game official may request that a game be stopped for a play to be reviewed.
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